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Industries across the euro zone cranked up output in November and Germany ended the year with its strongest growth in five years, data showed on Thursday, pointing to an economic spurt that may be arriving earlier than some ECB policymakers expect.

Euro zone industrial output in the 19-country currency bloc surged 1.5 percent on the month and 3.2 percent year-on-year as firms stepped up production before Christmas. Both figures were far better than expected.

That gelled with a surprisingly large increase in Italian industrial production, also reported on Thursday, and similarly robust numbers earlier this month from France.

The German statistics office, meanwhile, estimated growth in the euro zone largest economy was around 0.5 percent for the fourth quarter and expanded by 1.9 percent in 2016, the strongest rate in five years.

Economists said these figures added to the evidence that euro zone gross domestic product will have picked up in the last quarter of last year.

The numbers are also relatively unexpected. Indeed, investment bank Citi ranked the euro zone at the top of its Economic Surprise Index at year-end, higher even than the rating for Britain’s unforseen post-Brexit performance.

The strong rise of industrial output “reinforces our belief that euro zone GDP growth could well have reached 0.5 percent quarter-on-quarter in the fourth quarter of 2016,” said Howard Archer, economist at IHS Global Insight.

Euro zone GDP grew a modest 0.3 percent in second and third quarter of last year, after a 0.5 percent rise in the first quarter.

Thursday’s figures add to a jump in the bloc’s economic sentiment which in December reached its strongest level since March 2011.

Euro zone consumer confidence also hit a 20-month high in December and has been rising for four consecutive months, European Commission’s estimates showed.

Monthly retail sales in the bloc did fall by 0.4 percent in November but only after a rise by 1.4 percent in October, by far the largest in years.

CAUTION

The surprising burst in economic activity may fire up criticism from economists and politicians in countries such as Germany that the European Central Bank is hanging on too long to its ultra-easy monetary policy, including asset purchasing.

The ECB, however, remains cautious about the outlook and will need sustained evidence before it moves.

Indeed, the improved outlook for the last quarter of the year may however not carry over to 2017 in part because it brings with it an increase in prices.

“We expect rising inflation to weigh on consumer spending growth, causing overall GDP growth to slow in 2017,” Jack Allen of Capital Economics said.

Euro zone consumer inflation in December was 1.1 percent, the highest level since September 2013, as oil prices are going up. It remains under the roughly 2 percent target sought by the ECB, however.

A Reuters poll of over 65 economists released on Thursday showed little change in forecasts for euro zone growth and inflation with respondents citing uncertainty from rising protectionist sentiments after the Brexit vote last June and Donald Drumpf’s U.S. election win.

In addition, the November euro zone industrial output data confirmed caution is still prevailing among firms, as political uncertainty over the coming months restrains investment.

The monthly output rose strongly for non-durable consumer goods, such as clothing or foodstuff, a sign that companies were betting on more consumption ahead of the Christmas shopping.

Production grew markedly on the month also for intermediate goods and energy, but it rose only slightly for capital goods, like machineries, a sign of only limited appetite for long-term investment.

Output of durable goods, such as cars or refrigerators, was the only component of the indicator to record a drop, by 0.1 percent on the month, confirming firms’ cautious approach as consumers were less keen to purchase more expensive items.

Originally reported by Reuters

Remember, no issue has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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By all means visit our shores, but keep your filthy water to yourselves. That’s the message coming from the Baltic Sea this year, as the North European body of water becomes the first in the world to ban cruise ships from dumping waste water offshore. According to a decision announced by the International Maritime Organization this May, starting in 2019 all new ships entering the Baltic must either take their waste water away with them or pump it on land to be treated. In 2021 the rules will be extended to include older ships as well.

The timeframe still leaves the sea vulnerable in the interim. Currently, untreated waste water can be dumped 12 nautical miles (13.8 land miles) offshore and treated sewage just 3 nautical miles (3.5 land miles), which is why the Port of Helsinki announced sweeteners this week that will encourage visiting ships to stop dumping at sea now. Taken all together, they show the Baltic region taking a lead that other heavily frequented or vulnerable marine areas could well follow.

If the Baltic region is showing leadership here, it’s because it badly needs to. This year, the European Commission pronounced it “one of the most polluted seas in the world.” Cruise ships aren’t the key problem behind this of course. The Baltic’s waters have actually been most heavily blighted by two other factors. One is poor urban wastewater management, especially in the numerous cities along the sea’s Eastern and Southern coasts. The other is agricultural waste and fertilizer run-off. Combined, these two pollution sources fill the sea with nutrients that cause regular, vast algae blooms (already proving a problem this summer) that severely deplete the water’s oxygen levels. Exacerbating the issue is the Baltic’s shallowness (its average depth is around 180 feet) and the narrow outlet it has to the Atlantic from the Kattegat Sea dividing Denmark and Sweden.

The Baltic Sea Action Plan, introduced in 2007, has done much to help matters, improving waste water management in Saint Petersburg (the sea’s largest coastal city), the Baltic States and Poland, albeit not yet in the heavily polluting Russian city of Kaliningrad. But with algal blooms still commonplace, the region’s countries still need to attack pollution on all fronts, and even if they aren’t the main problem, cruise liners are nonetheless a major source of all sorts of filth. According to Friends of the Earth, a single week’s voyage for a large cruise ship creates an estimated 210,000 gallons of human sewage and one million gallons of grey water from showers, sinks, laundry and the like. Add all this together with extras such as bilge water mixed with oil, float the vessel discharging it all into vulnerable or heavily charted waters, and you have a veritable plague ship that risks contributing to a slug trail of eutrophication in which ever direction it turns its keel.

That’s why the city of Helsinki isn’t waiting until 2019 for the no-dump laws to kick in. It can’t really afford to. Over 236 ships will dock in the city’s harbor this summer, according to Finnish broadcaster YLE, and 12 large cruise liners will dock there within the next fortnight alone. In order to keep its waters relatively clear, the Port of Helsinki is offering a 20 percent discount to vessels that pump their waste on land to be treated. The uptake for this offer is likely to be all but unanimous, because ships that dock in the port must all pay the fee, whether they actually off-load waste there or not. Simply by taking advantage of a service they’ve already paid for, ships can cut their overheads. The offer should also get them used to using a service that will be mandatory for all ships after 2021.

Meanwhile, owners of some cruise ships, such as TUI Cruises, have been attempting to do their bit by reducing water consumption and adapting systems to ensure that less discharge of water into open seas is necessary. Taking a cruise may never become the most eco-friendly vacation option, but at least in the Baltic, the industry is being steered towards leaving far fewer problems in its wake.

Originally reported by CityLab.

Remember, no issue has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all legal matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable legal advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

With the world’s largest GDP, the European Union has become the cynosure of many investors all around the world. Many people are now trying to tap the European Union market through mergers and acquisitions and by investing in its key industries. The EU is in fact welcoming foreign investment in its member countries and has devised strategies which may encourage foreign investment in the country. The main steps taken by the European Union in encouraging FDI are its investor-friendly policies and the commitment of the member states to share the vision of the European Union has also worked in the favor as the member countries have now become the hottest destinations to invest in the world.

Here is a comprehensive information that will help investors about the various procedures and facts that are involved while investing in the European Union and will also give them an overview of why the EU is the current hottest destinations to invest in the entire world.

Policy Procedure of Investing (Legal / Regulatory) :

Expensive or burdensome processes involved in starting a business turn away many investors from investing in any particular state or country. The integration of the European Union understands this and hence has established a principle that would help investors to create a company in any of the EU country and that too on an equal level of the nationals based in EU.

In the year 2007, several member states of the European Union have agreed to set up some of the one-stop shop agencies that will help investors with business start-ups. This really shows that the Policy procedure adopted by the member states of the European Union is quite conducive towards attracting foreign investment in the EU.

The European Union has come a long way in deregulating the foreign investment and has opened up its markets for foreign investors to invest in almost all of the sectors in the member countries. It has moved on from the traditional BIT Model and has started promoting a shift in its regulatory priorities. The European Union is now focusing more on liberalizing its markets even further to foreign investors and is mulling to aim a balance among the varied interests of the foreign investors and host and home countries.

Business Information:

Tax, Duties and GST:

The European Union has also taken necessary action to eradicate the tax hindrances and inadequacies. This has been mainly achieved through the VAT, car tax areas, and excise duties. The European Union has suggested that the tax policy of the EU should be such that it helps the businesses to achieve their goals. The EU is also working on eradicating the loopholes that exist in the existing 15 different tax systems within the EU and is trying to make them comprehensive and simpler to businesses as well as individuals.

The Goods and Services Tax in the European Union has been below the world standards and the European Commission is taking all the necessary steps to bring out reforms in the tax policies in the various member countries of the European Union to make them more investor-friendly. The member states of the European Union are also offering huge tax exemptions to foreign investors especially those who are investing in the regions where there are less employment opportunities.

Starting a Business in the EU:

As per 2001, it took an average of 22 days to start a company in the EU whereas there are three member countries of the European Union, The United Kingdom, Denmark and Norway which rank among the top ten countries in ease of doing business in the entire world. The enactment of the Small Business Act in the year 2008 has further sped up the process of starting a company and has also reduced the costs that are required while setting up a business. The European Commission has asked all the member states to provide the permits, licenses and other authorisations necessary to start a business within a deadline of one month. Adhering to this concern, the member states have agree to make some changes and are working towards reducing the time to register a new business to one week and are also working towards reducing the fees that are need to be paid while setting up a business.

Intellectual Property (IP) in the EU:

The European Union guarantees a uniform system of protection of intellectual property rights that range from copyright and related rights to property rights. The protection of intellectual property rights in the European Union is done as per the international conventions, majority of which are implemented by world agencies such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO), World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO). The European Union also has its own bodies known as the European Patent Office (EPO) and the Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market (OHIM) with the latter dealing with the registration of community trademarks and designs.

Apart from these, the European Commission is also campaigning to introduce the Community patent system that would implement be more legally effective and less costly and would offer a large amount of competition in the European industry. Furthermore, the protection of the rights also includes protection from counterfeiting, illegal trade and piracy.

An investor-friendly policy, supportive member state governments and supportive foreign investment agencies all these features really make the European Union one of the best places to invest in the entire world. Investors who wish to expand their business worldwide should not overlook the strategic benefits which the EU offers and should definitely consider investing in the European Union.

These materials are not intended and should not be used as legal advice or other recommendation. If you need a legal opinion on a specific issue or factual situation, please contact a lawyer. Anyone using these materials should not rely on them as a substitute for legal advice.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

The EU cyber security strategy sets out the EU’s strategy for preventing and responding to disruptions and attacks affecting Europe’s telecommunications systems.

The proposed directive would impose a minimum level of security for digital technologies, networks and services across all member states. It also proposes to make it compulsory for certain businesses and organisations to report significant cyber incidents. The list includes search engines, cloud providers, social networks, public administrations, online payment platforms like PayPal, and major eCommerce websites, such as Amazon.

The proposal was published in two parts on 7 February 2013. The first part is a communication from the Commission and the EU’s High Representative for foreign affairs and security policy outlining an EU cyber security strategy. This is supported by the second element of the strategy – a European Commission proposal for a directive on network and information security.

Why Is It Needed?

The cyber security strategy and proposed directive supports the digital agenda for Europe, which aims to help Europe’s citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies.

Today’s IT systems can be seriously affected by security incidents, such as technical failures and viruses. These kinds of incidents, often called network information security (NIS) incidents, are becoming more frequent and difficult to deal with.

Many businesses and governments across the EU rely on digital networks and infrastructure to provide their essential services. This means that when NIS incidents occur, they can have a huge impact by compromising services and stopping businesses working properly. In addition, with the development of the EU’s internal market, many network and information systems work across borders. An NIS incident in one country can therefore have an effect in others and even across the whole EU. Security incidents also undermine consumer confidence in online payment systems and IT networks.

By introducing more consistent risk management measures and systematic reporting of incidents the proposed directive would help sectors depending on IT systems to be more reliable and stable.

EU Cyber Security Strategy: An Open, Safe and Secure Cyberspace

The EU cyber security strategy sets out the EU’s approach on best preventing and responding to cyber disruptions and attacks. It details a series of actions to enhance the cyber resilience of IT systems, reduce cybercrime and strengthen EU international cyber security policy and cyber defence.

The strategy sets out plans to address challenges under five priority areas:

  • Achieving cyber resilience
  • Drastically reducing cybercrime
  • Developing cyber defence policy and capabilities related to the EU’s common security and defence policy (CSDP)
  • Developing the industrial and technological resources for cyber security
  • Establishing a coherent international cyberspace policy for the EU

One of the main actions under the strategy is the draft directive on network and information security.

Proposal for a Directive on Measures to Ensure a High Level of Network and Information Security Across the EU – 2013/0027(COD)

The draft directive on network and information security (NIS) is an important element of the cyber security strategy. It would require all EU member states, key internet companies and infrastructure operators, such as e-commerce platforms, social networks and transport, banking and healthcare services, to ensure a secure and trustworthy digital environment throughout the EU. As the current approach to NIS is based on voluntary action, national capability and the levels of private sector involvement and preparedness vary considerably between member states. The draft directive aims to level the playing field by introducing harmonised rules to apply in all EU countries.

The proposed measures include:

  • The requirement for EU member states to adopt an NIS strategy and designate a national NIS authority with adequate resources to prevent, handle and respond to NIS risks and incidents
  • The creation of a cooperation mechanism among member states and the Commission to share early warnings on risks and incidents, exchange information, and counter NIS threats and incidents
  • The requirement for certain digital companies and services to adopt risk management practices and report major IT security incidents to the competent national authority.

The requirement to report IT security incidents aims to help develop a culture of risk management and make sure that information is shared between private and public sectors. It covers:

  • Critical infrastructure operators in sectors such as financial services, transport, energy and health
  • IT service companies, including app stores, e-commerce platforms, internet payment platforms, cloud computing platforms, search engines and social networks
  • Public administrations

In the Council

The European Parliament adopted its position at first reading on 13 March 2014 on the proposed network and information security directive.

Following preparatory work by the Working Group on Telecommunications and the Information Society (WP TELE), the Council held an initialorientation debate on the draft directive on 6 June 2013.

At a TTE Council meeting on 5 December 2013, ministers took note of a progress report on the directive. The report highlighted ongoing preparatory work on issues such as the scope of the directive, the terminology used, the set-up of the cooperation network, and the requirements for the national NIS strategies.

The Council discussed a further progress report at the TTE meeting on 6 June 2014. In particular, ministers looked at the best way to cooperate to improve the preparedness and reactions to cyber security threats. They concluded that the NIS directive should focus on high-level strategic and policy cooperation. However, ministers also want it to give more direction to the operational cooperation that already takes place in several bodies. They agreed that discussions should continue on the practical arrangements for cooperation.

At a TTE Council meeting on 27 November 2014, the presidency briefed ministers on the state of play of work on the draft NIS directive. At the end of 2014, the Council held two trilogue meetings on the directive with the European Parliament. A third trilogue meeting took place on 30 April 2015. Although progress was made during the trilogue, important differences remained between the Council and European Parliament positions. The trilogue was therefore useful in further clarifying their respective concerns.

At a fourth trilogue meeting on 29 June 2015, the Council reached an understanding with the European Parliament on the main principles to be included in the draft NIS directive. These principles will now have to be turned into legal provisions to allow for a final deal on the directive at a later stage. Negotiations will continue in the second half of 2015.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of cyber security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to cyber security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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