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musiqana

Musiqana, a Syrian band based in Berlin, Germany, performs during a concert on December 18, 2016, marking their record release. The musicians from left: Alaa Zaitouna, Adel Sabawi, Abdallah Rahhal, Bila Hammour and Hazem Nassreddine. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber).

Instead of bombs there were beats. Guitars took over for guns. And there were cheers, not screams. But Aleppo was never far from the minds of the band Musiqana and the crowd at its record release concert in Berlin.

“I didn’t know if I should cry or be happy,” said Samaa Hijazi, a 20-year-old medical student has been in Germany about five years but grew up in Syria. “I was thinking about the times my father sang these songs. I sang them together with my brother. And they are all still in Syria.”

Lead singer Abdallah Rahhal, 28, is an Aleppo native, and the band’s music is the city’s version of Arab Tarab, a traditional Arab music often referred to as “musical euphoria,” with emotional and poetic lyrics.

They’ve been working on the five-track, self-produced recording called “The Beautiful One” since forming as a band in January, but almost called off the release party, saying it didn’t feel right to celebrate and dance while the humanitarian disaster in and around Aleppo continued.

But in the end, they decided it was better to go ahead with the performance on Dec. 18, bringing their Tarab songs, known to most in the Arab world, to a European audience.

“Every day there is tragedy, and every day we play music,” said guitar player Adel Sabawi, who is from Damascus. “We came here not to make the people happy but we have a message: it is true that we are displaced, but we have music, and we have traditional music, and we try to bring it here.”

The five band members are all recent arrivals, part of a wave of hundreds of thousands who have made their way to Germany over the past two years. They met at an event called “refugees in concert,” and have since played more than two dozen concerts as a band, the largest one with the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra in front of 1,500 people.

The record release concert drew a mix of Germans and Syrians to a 1920s venue that used to be a silent film cinema before becoming a vegetable warehouse in what was once East Berlin.

Many Germans had come to learn more about the Syrian culture of the migrants that are living next to them.

“I was simply curious,” said Heike Winter after the concert. “I wanted to get to know these people and their music. And I’m really happy that they brought their culture here.”

Rahhal said the last 12 months has provided the band the opportunity to “tell the German people about our culture. About our music. About how we make parties.”

He says he also hopes interacting with his German hosts will help them see him and his bandmates as something other than refugees.

“Refugee, that’s not my name. And it is not my work. I’m a singer. I’m a Syrian man,” he said. “But the problem is that my situation is that I’m a refugee. It is only the situation.”

Originally reported by Associated Press.

Remember, no issue has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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El Vedadillo wind farm, 60 kilometres south of Pamplona.

El Vedadillo wind farm is 60 kilometres south of Pamplona. (ABC News: Niall Lenihan)

Enough wind energy is being generated in Spain to power more than 29 million homes every day, according to one of the country’s biggest renewable energy companies.

While Australia debates the future role of renewables after the blackout in South Australia, Spain is determined to remain one of the global leaders in the field.

Spanish firm Acciona gave ABC News access to its control centre in Pamplona where it monitors 9,500 wind turbines around the world on a minute-by-minute basis.

A large screen allows employees to zoom in on specific wind turbines — some up to 17,000 kilometres away in Australia — and determine if the blades are pitched perfectly or if maintenance is needed.

“The important thing is to predict and forecast what is going to happen,” the centre’s director Miguel Ezpeleta said.

‘It’s A Real Situation’

During the night in November last year, wind energy provided 70 per cent of Spain’s electricity needs.

A daytime record was reached in January 2015, when 54 per cent of electricity use was provided by wind.

“It’s incredible. Some years ago people would say we would be crazy people saying these kinds of things, just dreaming but today it’s a real situation,” Mr Ezpeleta said.

But he was adamant the peak of 70 per cent was not the limit.

“I think people are going to tell me we’re crazy but I’m pretty sure we’ll arrive at 100 per cent for one moment for sure,” Mr Ezpeleta said.

The European Union target for 2020 is for Spain to reach 20 per cent of all energy needs, including electricity, heating, cooling and transport using renewable energy.

It is currently at 17.4 per cent — just below that target.

Cradle of Renewable Energy

Every July, thousands of tourists come to Pamplona for the famous running of the bulls.

But the area is also renowned for being the Cradle of Renewable Energy.

It was here the power and possibilities of wind were recognised in the 1980s.

Spain is not rich in oil or gas and has very little coal, so it either imported the resources or began finding other ways to create energy.

Spain’s mix has been very broad. Nuclear power accounts for 20.9 per cent, while natural gas and coal are both just above 15 per cent each.

There is no talk of closing down Spain’s nuclear power stations, but they do want to decrease the amount spent importing fuel from elsewhere.

And that is where wind comes into the picture.

At the El Vedadillo wind farm, 60 kilometres south of Pamplona, the turbine blades spin slowly, casting shadows on the ground.

The nearest village, Falces, earns a third of its yearly budget from the surrounding wind farms.

Its Mayor Valentin Garcia said residents were happy to rely on renewable energy and he could not remember the last time there were any blackouts.

“There’s a very good perception of wind technology because of two reasons,” Mr Garcia said.

“One reason is the economical benefit for the town and the second is we are helping to produce cleaner energies.”

High Power Bills Remain

Critics said renewable energies had not brought down electricity prices in Spain, in fact some suggested they had increased as much as 60 per cent since 2006.

“Every day is getting more expensive. I don’t know if it’s because of the taxes or why,” Falces resident Maria Angeles Verjara said.

One argument is, while wind is cheap, there will always be the need for backups — because wind is unpredictable and keeping other power sources, like Spain’s nuclear power stations, operational is costly.

But Acciona executives disputed those criticisms and director for the Asia-Pacific region Javier Montes said countries should not be discouraged from setting high renewable energy targets.

“Properly managed, there should be no issues with that. The examples in Europe show that,” Mr Montes said.

“The one thing going in Spain’s favour is that the electrical system has been built with the goal of making it very reliable and able to take very heavy knocks with extreme weather events or major technical failures.”

Originally reported by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

Remember, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries or to Request a Personal Quote Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Francis Thomas Matthews,
Deputy Global Director, No. 8
Marketing Research & Development Division,
Email : deputy.gd.8@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1924
Connect : LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook I Tumblr

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

The European Union launched a program on Monday to issue monthly electronic cash grants to benefit a million refugees in Turkey, as part of a deal under which Ankara will curb the numbers trying to enter Europe.

The Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN) will give refugees pre-paid cards for food, housing, schooling or medical expenses in Turkey.

Earlier this year, EU countries approved a fund of 3 billion euros ($3.37 billion) to help Turkey improve living conditions for some 3 million Syrian migrants on its territory. The ESSN is part of that deal.

“Today we launch the biggest and largest humanitarian project the EU has ever supported. It will provide a basic source of income for 1 million Syrian refugees,” Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides said at a news conference.

“The ESSN is perfect proof of the EU’s commitment to tackle the challenge posed by the refugee crisis,” he said.

The EU is also funding other humanitarian projects in Turkey. But President Tayyip Erdogan has accused the bloc of not following through on its financial pledges.

More than a million migrants entered the European Union after crossing from Turkey to Greece by boat last year. Since Turkey agreed to prevent people from setting sail from its shores, the numbers taking that route have fallen dramatically.

On Turkey’s criticism that the promised EU aid for refugees was slow to arrive, Stylianides said he held discussions with Turkey’s EU Affairs Minister Omer Celik on the issue.

“I think now minister Celik recognizes and realizes that this process for all European funding is going well and I think day by day the situation is getting better,” he said.

The ESSN will be implemented by the World Food Programme and the Turkish Red Crescent, in collaboration with the Turkish Ministry of Family and Social Policy and the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency.

Originally reported by Reuters.

Remember, no issue has a quick fix solution. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all investment matters ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable investment advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialised units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu
Connect : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook – Quora

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

The EU cyber security strategy sets out the EU’s strategy for preventing and responding to disruptions and attacks affecting Europe’s telecommunications systems.

The proposed directive would impose a minimum level of security for digital technologies, networks and services across all member states. It also proposes to make it compulsory for certain businesses and organisations to report significant cyber incidents. The list includes search engines, cloud providers, social networks, public administrations, online payment platforms like PayPal, and major eCommerce websites, such as Amazon.

The proposal was published in two parts on 7 February 2013. The first part is a communication from the Commission and the EU’s High Representative for foreign affairs and security policy outlining an EU cyber security strategy. This is supported by the second element of the strategy – a European Commission proposal for a directive on network and information security.

Why Is It Needed?

The cyber security strategy and proposed directive supports the digital agenda for Europe, which aims to help Europe’s citizens and businesses to get the most out of digital technologies.

Today’s IT systems can be seriously affected by security incidents, such as technical failures and viruses. These kinds of incidents, often called network information security (NIS) incidents, are becoming more frequent and difficult to deal with.

Many businesses and governments across the EU rely on digital networks and infrastructure to provide their essential services. This means that when NIS incidents occur, they can have a huge impact by compromising services and stopping businesses working properly. In addition, with the development of the EU’s internal market, many network and information systems work across borders. An NIS incident in one country can therefore have an effect in others and even across the whole EU. Security incidents also undermine consumer confidence in online payment systems and IT networks.

By introducing more consistent risk management measures and systematic reporting of incidents the proposed directive would help sectors depending on IT systems to be more reliable and stable.

EU Cyber Security Strategy: An Open, Safe and Secure Cyberspace

The EU cyber security strategy sets out the EU’s approach on best preventing and responding to cyber disruptions and attacks. It details a series of actions to enhance the cyber resilience of IT systems, reduce cybercrime and strengthen EU international cyber security policy and cyber defence.

The strategy sets out plans to address challenges under five priority areas:

  • Achieving cyber resilience
  • Drastically reducing cybercrime
  • Developing cyber defence policy and capabilities related to the EU’s common security and defence policy (CSDP)
  • Developing the industrial and technological resources for cyber security
  • Establishing a coherent international cyberspace policy for the EU

One of the main actions under the strategy is the draft directive on network and information security.

Proposal for a Directive on Measures to Ensure a High Level of Network and Information Security Across the EU – 2013/0027(COD)

The draft directive on network and information security (NIS) is an important element of the cyber security strategy. It would require all EU member states, key internet companies and infrastructure operators, such as e-commerce platforms, social networks and transport, banking and healthcare services, to ensure a secure and trustworthy digital environment throughout the EU. As the current approach to NIS is based on voluntary action, national capability and the levels of private sector involvement and preparedness vary considerably between member states. The draft directive aims to level the playing field by introducing harmonised rules to apply in all EU countries.

The proposed measures include:

  • The requirement for EU member states to adopt an NIS strategy and designate a national NIS authority with adequate resources to prevent, handle and respond to NIS risks and incidents
  • The creation of a cooperation mechanism among member states and the Commission to share early warnings on risks and incidents, exchange information, and counter NIS threats and incidents
  • The requirement for certain digital companies and services to adopt risk management practices and report major IT security incidents to the competent national authority.

The requirement to report IT security incidents aims to help develop a culture of risk management and make sure that information is shared between private and public sectors. It covers:

  • Critical infrastructure operators in sectors such as financial services, transport, energy and health
  • IT service companies, including app stores, e-commerce platforms, internet payment platforms, cloud computing platforms, search engines and social networks
  • Public administrations

In the Council

The European Parliament adopted its position at first reading on 13 March 2014 on the proposed network and information security directive.

Following preparatory work by the Working Group on Telecommunications and the Information Society (WP TELE), the Council held an initialorientation debate on the draft directive on 6 June 2013.

At a TTE Council meeting on 5 December 2013, ministers took note of a progress report on the directive. The report highlighted ongoing preparatory work on issues such as the scope of the directive, the terminology used, the set-up of the cooperation network, and the requirements for the national NIS strategies.

The Council discussed a further progress report at the TTE meeting on 6 June 2014. In particular, ministers looked at the best way to cooperate to improve the preparedness and reactions to cyber security threats. They concluded that the NIS directive should focus on high-level strategic and policy cooperation. However, ministers also want it to give more direction to the operational cooperation that already takes place in several bodies. They agreed that discussions should continue on the practical arrangements for cooperation.

At a TTE Council meeting on 27 November 2014, the presidency briefed ministers on the state of play of work on the draft NIS directive. At the end of 2014, the Council held two trilogue meetings on the directive with the European Parliament. A third trilogue meeting took place on 30 April 2015. Although progress was made during the trilogue, important differences remained between the Council and European Parliament positions. The trilogue was therefore useful in further clarifying their respective concerns.

At a fourth trilogue meeting on 29 June 2015, the Council reached an understanding with the European Parliament on the main principles to be included in the draft NIS directive. These principles will now have to be turned into legal provisions to allow for a final deal on the directive at a later stage. Negotiations will continue in the second half of 2015.

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of cyber security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to cyber security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

The European Commission and High Representative’s 2013 Cyber Security Strategy was the EU’s first comprehensive policy document in this area. It covers the internal market, justice and home affairs and foreign policy angles of cyberspace.

The Strategy is accompanied by a legislative proposal to strengthen the security of the EU’s information systems. This will encourage economic growth as confidence in buying online and using the Internet grows.

The Strategy makes clear the priorities for EU international cyberspace policy:

  • Freedom and Openness: the strategy outlines the vision and principles on applying core EU values and fundamental rights in cyberspace.
  • The EU’s Laws, Norms and Core Values Apply as much in Cyberspace as in the Physical World: responsibility for a more secure cyberspace lies with all players within the global information society, from citizens to governments.
  • Developing Cybersecurity Capacity Building: the EU engages with international partners and organisations, the private sector and civil society to support global capacity building in third countries. This includes improving access to information and to an open Internet, and preventing cyber threats.
  • Fostering International Cooperation in Cyberspace: preserving open, free and secure cyberspace is a global challenge, which the EU is addressing together with relevant international partners and organisations, the private sector and civil society.

Read more here:

Remember, no problem has a quick fix solution, particularly issues of cyber security in any form. Thus, always ensure to consult highly knowledgeable group of professionals whom would provide you with a collective advice, never individual advice. This group advice and approach is unique with CWIIL Group and is based on the overall Management Philosophy of all CWIIL Group Companies.

Consulting CWIIL Group of Companies, for any / all matters relating to cyber security ranging from individual to national levels, ensures advice based on highest level of knowledge which are given to you by a team of select research-oriented experts whom each will do their own assessment of your matter, and also assess it together, thus ensuring that in case a mistake has been made by one, it will be noticed and corrected even before it is being passed on to you. Receiving incorrect and un-knowledgeable security advice can be disastrous and thus should be avoided.

CWIIL Group of Companies is a global group of multi-specialized units with diversified interests and activities, wherein each company is a separate legal entity registered under prevailing laws in different parts of the world. CWIIL Group of Companies Products, Services, Project and Solutions are in a multitude of Verticals including, but not limited to, Infrastructure, Power, Oil & Gas, Legal, Media, Technology, ITES, HR, Shipping, Aviation, Real Estate, Hospitals, Health and Medicine, Education, Funding & Investment, Business and Legal Consultancy, and Public Private Partnerships, and other CWIIL Group Units, worldwide, to name a few.

For Further Queries Feel Free to Contact :

Mr. Gregor Novak,
Deputy Global Director, No. 11,
Operations Research & Implementation Division,
Email : deputy.gd.11@cwiilgroup.eu
Voice : +45.8176.1946
Social Media : LinkedIn – Twitter – Facebook

For Queries Specific to the EU Region :
Email : eu@cwiilgroup.com , hq@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.com , www.cwiilgroup.eu

For Any / All Other Queries :
CWIIL Group Global Regional Headquarters Denmark,
Address : No. 1, Klokkebjergevej, DK6900 Skjern, Denmark
Voice : +45.5148.3608
Fax : +45.7014.1498
Email : corpcomm@cwiilgroup.eu
Web : www.cwiilgroup.eu

Office Hours :
Monday to Friday : 10.00 – 17.00 CET.
Saturday : 10.00 – 14.00 CET.
Sunday : Closed.

The Corporate Communications Team would require minimum a fortnight for Reviewing & Responding to Queries, which please note.

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